Devin Singh

Devin Singh

Devin Singh studies religious thought in the modern West and in sites of colonial encounter, with attention to the Christian tradition and its interaction with economy and politics. In addition to the history of Christian thought, his research engages the philosophy of religion and social ethics. Singh explores questions of religion and politics, religion and economics, secularization, sociology of markets and money, and race & coloniality in relation to religion. His first book, Divine Currency: The Theological Power of Money in the West (Stanford, 2018) examines the ways early Christian thinkers made use of monetary and economic concepts as they created Christian doctrine, and how this close relationship between theology and money has lent a sacred aura to economics as it developed in the West. Singh was guest editor for a special issue of Political Theology on “Love in a Time of Capital,” and guest co-editor for a special issue of Journal of Religious Ethics on debt. Singh’s work has been supported by the Lilly Endowment and Luce Foundation, and has received national recognition by the Mellon and Whiting Fellowships, Louisville Institute, and the Forum for Theological Exploration, as well as international recognition by the Lautenschlaeger Award from the University of Heidelberg. Prior to joining the faculty at Dartmouth, Singh was a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in the Integrated Humanities and Lecturer in Religious Studies at Yale University, and served more recently as a visiting scholar at Harvard Divinity School’s Center for the Study of World Religions. For the 2019-20 academic year, he will be a visiting scholar at Princeton University’s Center for the Study of Religion.

Essays

The Fluidity of the Field

Even while the concept of canon has been thoroughly critiqued and deconstructed, implicit canons remain and it may be best to acknowledge their presence rather than seek to repress them.

Pedagogy