PTN Summer Virtual Workshops

Due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, the Political Theology Network presents Summer 2020 Workshop Series online, via Zoom, weekly starting on July 13 until August 24

Around the Network

The journal Political Theology recently released a new issue, 21:4, guest edited by Paul Billingham and Jonathan Chaplin. It is part of an initiative to gather political theorists interested in religion and scholars of religion interested in political theory, and it is being published in coordination with a special issue of the journal Social Theory and Practice.

When Dalits write, they contest these misrepresentations and objectifications, and provide a sub-version of the texts. When Dalits write, they experience liberation. A decolonial reading of this given text calls us to offer our support and solidarity with #Blacklivesmatter and #Dalitlivesmatter, recognising an agency of liberation in our Dalit and Black bodies, lives, and texts.

Due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, the Political Theology Network presents Summer 2020 Workshop Series online, via Zoom, weekly starting on July 13 until August 24

The journal Political Theology recently released a new issue, 21:4, guest edited by Paul Billingham and Jonathan Chaplin. It is part of an initiative to gather political theorists interested in religion and scholars of religion interested in political theory, and it is being published in coordination with a special issue of the journal Social Theory and Practice.

Outgoing editor Kyle Lambelet welcomes Wonchul Shin as the new managing editor for the PTN website.

Whose Face is on the Coin? Economic Justice and Political Theology

“Whose head is this, and whose title?” They answered, “The emperor’s.” Jesus said to them, “Give to the emperor the things that are the emperor’s, and to God the things that are God’s.” And they were utterly amazed at him. (Mark 12:16-17, NRSV)

Justice

These questions of environmental justice become even more urgent in the face of our current crisis, as we see the disproportionate effects of COVID-19 on the same communities who suffer the most from other environmental harms.

A search for origins is also always a search for meaning. In a time of political crisis such as ours, when origin narratives are especially tempting, fresh reminders of their limitations and violent potential are welcome.