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Catholic Re-Visions

“My secret is God, I’m God’s secret” [1]: desire, the closet, and queer ministry

In Spain, a man contests the sexual politics of the Catholic Church by opening the first LGBTQ+ faith refuge.

Learning from Zora Neale Hurston

The best place to begin in bringing theology and anthropology closer together is with someone who did not write as if the two were separate, even opposed disciplines. Zora Neale Hurston carried out ethnographic fieldwork on behalf of Franz Boas, and yet, writing in multiple genres, articulated a theological vision that meshed the universal God with particular human experience: “Nothing that God ever made is the same thing to more than one person.”

Women Prevailing Against Limited Vision

Lydia does not need a man or any other figure of authority to speak for her or to dictate her life. She is her own agent and even Luke-Acts’ Paul has to respect that. She cares for her own, commits to seeking justice, and makes her own choices.

Call for Papers: Political Theology Network’s 2022 Summer Workshop Series, “Varieties of Political Theological Method”

Authors should submit a 500 word abstract to Mary Nickel (mnickel@princeton.edu) and Kathy Chow (kathy.chow@yale.edu) by May 15. Please put “PTN Workshop Series Proposal” in the subject line. We will notify participants of our decisions by May 22.

New PTN Leadership Team

The PTN Executive Committee welcomes Dr. Wonhee Anne Joh and Dr. Tommy Lynch into its ranks.

New Political Theology Journal Leadership

The journal Political Theology announces its new leadership structure, welcoming three new editors and a new assistant editor.

The Brink

George Shulman’s Letters on Political Theology

This symposium celebrates George Shulman’s work on political theology by continuing the conversation that formally concluded when Shulman’s “Political Theology” seminar met for the last time in the spring of 2021.

On the Catholicity of Desire

Although its aim is to provide a snapshot of our research and thinking on the topic of desire, this symposium hints at aspects of ourselves as desiring subjects, as people who bring differing social and sexual identities to their work, and who inhabit religious and secular worlds in diverse ways.

Disciplinary crossings

Why are anthropologists and theologians drawn to each other? What are they seeking?