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Yerevanci, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
Justice

Healing as a Metaphor? An Interview with Laura Levitt

“‘I think that the ways that we move through time and space and objects move through time and space connects us…They can occasion a kind of connection.’ It is ‘our tender care’ for these objects, not merely their proximity to violent suffering, that transforms them into sacred objects.”

Political Theologies of Debilitation

As Puar illustrates, debility ensures future sources of profitable capacitation in the name of liberal democracy and liberal rights bearing subjects. I am interested in what can be gained by attending to religion in this constellation, with the goal of further elaborating the dialectic of material and belief that engenders debility.

On “Blessedness”

Rather than read it prescriptively to justify my own identification as a “righteous Christian,” I now read this passage for what it is: a poem that describes the resilience of a people who found true comfort and safety in God, despite attacks from those who would cause them harm.

CFP – (How to Do) Political Theology without Men?

The journal Political Theology announces a call for proposals for its special issue on (how to do) political theology without men, as well as for an article development workshop for junior scholars and practitioners.

PTN Event: What Good is Theory? Religion, Critique, and Truth

Please join a joint event “What Good Is Theory? Religion, Critique, and Truth” on April 28, 2021

PTN Mentoring Festival

On Saturday April 24th, the Political Theology Network will be hosting a virtual Mentoring Festival for graduate students, dissertation writers, and other emerging scholars.

Justice

Global Symposium I: The Hong Kong Protests and Political Theology

The Political Theology Network is pleased to present the special global symposium on the Hong Kong Protests and Political Theology

Rethinking Biopolitics: A Forum on Jasbir Puar’s The Right to Maim: Debility, Capacity, Disability

Among the central achievements of this book is the way it conducts an intersectional analysis that takes the conceptual glue of the triangular encounter of debility, capacity, and disability to put into conversation the study of race, religion, queer studies, disability studies, and the study of colonial power.

Church State Corporation

Church State Corporation is a powerful reminder that . . . rights [are] recognized on a whim rather than guaranteed by nature.