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Category: Traditions

Religious and secular traditions are internally plural and in constant development through engagement with external others. Political theology engages these (a)religious formations and their diverse global manifestations.

Resources

Bibliography:

  1. Delores Williams, Sisters in the Wilderness: The Challenge of Womanist God-Talk (1993)
  2. Saba Mahmood, Religious Difference in a Secular Age: A Minority Report (2015)
  3. Vincent Lloyd, Black Natural Law (2016)
  4. Tisa Wenger, We Have a Religion: The 1920s Pueblo Indian Dance Controversy and American Religious Freedom (2009)
  5. Daniel Boyarin, Border Lines: The Partition of Judaeo-Christianity (2004)
  6. The Commission on Theological Concerns of the Christian Conference of Asia (ed.), Minjung Theology: People as the Subjects of History (1983)
  7. Ashon Crawley, Blackpentecostal Breath: The Aesthetics of Possibility (2016)
  8. William T. Cavanaugh, The Myth of Religious Violence: Secular Ideology and the Roots of Modern Conflict (2009)

Relevant Journal Articles:

  • Inese Radzins, “Simone Weil’s Political Theology,” Political Theology 17, no. 3 (2016): 226-242
  • Lap Yan Kung, “Parent-Child and Center-Edge Metaphors: A Theological Engagement with the Social Imaginary of ‘One Country, Two Systems,’” Political Theology 20, no. 5 (2019): 392-410
  • SherAli Tareen, “Muslim Political Theology Before and After Empire: Shāh Muḥammad Ismāʿīl’s Station of Leadership (Manṣab-i Imāmat),” Political Theology 21, no. 1-2 (2020): 105-125
  • Julie E. Cooper, “Heretic or Traitor?  Spinoza’s Excommunication and the Challenge That Judaism Poses to the Study of Religious Diversity,” Political Theology 21, no. 4 (2020): 284-302
Fred Moten

Moten’s prophecy bespeaks aesthetic registers in ordinary (Black) life, but he denies that the aesthetic is redemptive.

Claude Lefort

It is as productive to think with as it is to think against Claude Lefort, a revolutionary-turned-philosopher who analyzed power and the political regimes to which it gives rise.

Enrique Dussel

Rafael Vizcaíno offers a biographical introduction to the philosophical work of Enrique Dussel, a major figure of the decolonial turn. Separate from his theology, Dussel’s philosophy of liberation offers crucial reflections for contemporary political theology.

François Laruelle

“[For] quantum gnostics, there has never been a creation of the world or in the world—it is the world that is ‘wicked’ or ‘evil’, and consequently also the God who claimed to have created it and yet hesitates to assume it.”

Isabelle Stengers

Isabelle Stengers, continental philosopher of science, offers pragmatic resources for animating thinking with interest and passion, affirming heresy over conformity and undercutting the all-too-common binaries of religion/science and science/fiction.

N. Katherine Hayles

A reflection on the political implications of N. Katherine Hayles’ critical aesthetic inquiry into the ecological relationships between the human and the technological, thought and cognition, and information and materiality.

Niklas Luhmann

David Kline introduces the systems theory of Niklas Luhmann for political theology and reflects on how it might think about its own limits of observation.

Luce Irigaray

“Perhaps it is in precisely this ambivalent way that air (and Irigaray) reminds us of just how much we belong—to the air itself, to this emptiness that hovers and sings in lifedeath. We might forget air, we might forget that we breathe, or how to breathe. But air does not forget us. And air will never cease to carry us, to lift us up, to set us into flight, even when we no longer live in a body that tried (if unsuccessfully) to fly.”

Silvia Federici

Federici provides a model for political theologians engaging with race, gender, and sexuality through the lens of capitalist oppression

Kojin Karatani

A short overview of Kojin Karatani’s Marxist influenced focus on modes of exchange as revealing the Borromean ring of Capital-Nation-State, and the import of this ring for religion.

The Network of Relationships in Law and Religion

There are at least six identifiable and interrelated relationships in the three books under consideration in this forum. Investigations into the nature, expectations, and communicative barriers in any given relationship is of value to our broader scholarly field but so too is asking how the contours of one relationship may impact that of another

What Good is “Religion”?

Regardless of our interrogation of it, the terminology of “religion” is operative in the world—not only among the scholars who frame it as a second-order category, but among our interlocutors and kinship networks. Given the baggage that often accompanies it, perhaps it is unsurprising that so many of us are hesitant to apply this label to the people, places, and practices to which we attach meaning.