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Category: Essays

Past the Horizon: Speculative Fiction and Political Theology

Political practices have more in common with literary techniques than one might assume. In reflecting on how we build worlds to inhabit, political theology can draw on sources and themes from speculative fiction to help us imagine ourselves beyond the structures we inhabit.

Being ¡Presente! An Interview with Diana Taylor

“What can we do when apparently nothing can be done, and doing nothing is not an option?” Theologian Kyle Lambelet and performance theorist Diana Taylor discuss the challenge and possibilities of presence within systems that seem to allow no alternative.

Bernard Stiegler on the Dangers of the Digital

Stiegler argues that capitalism has now reached its limits and that the future of the planet in what he calls ‘control societies’ echoing Deleuze is open to question.

Pandemic Police Populism

Blaming Covid 19 on the World Health Organization or on a lab in China and calling Black Lives Matter “radical leftist extremists” follow the American-populist playbook of responding to duress by targeting an alien “other” who have wronged “us” and whom “we’re” right to combat with force.

Viral and Human Origins

If the scientific work of phylogenomics teaches us that evolutionary history is more complex, and less clear than we might have imagined, this has not had an effect on the commercialization of human racial ancestry.

Genius, Genealogy, and Get Out: On Melanosis

The Sunken Place’s genius consists in the fact that it-itself conjures the genealogy of the “statement” it makes.

The Violence of Care: on Genealogy and Social Reproduction

To become part of an institution as a member of a group which has historically been excluded from the university or from the discipline of theology is to be extremely conscious of the fragility of our survival within that institution, to feel the necessity of struggling against the forces of reproduction which conspire towards our ongoing exclusion.

Rethinking Genealogy, Rethinking Race

To read genealogically in this mode is to read anachronistically, to theorize the present through temporally removed contexts while allowing for their difference.

Genealogy’s Bad Blood

An epidemiology of critique investigates our work as genealogists by taking it too literally. It exaggerates, satirically, the materiality of genealogy’s metaphor and clarifies, sincerely, how it structures critique’s politics—its predisposition to quarantine, purge, and escape.

“Unalienable” Rights? Pompeo, Porter, and the Popes

Invoking “natural law” in debates over human rights does not necessarily lead to privileging religious rights over others, denying people’s rights to express their sexual or gender identity, or refusing to acknowledge economic and social rights.

The Politics of Color at the Strait Called Detroit

The primal brilliance of the color-scheme—aquamarine Sturgeon-Queen arising fierce and indistinguishable from the sun-shimmered waters themselves, in (visually) bombastic counterpoint to a burnt-rouge sun-rise sky—tags the eye with trance-invitation.

Troubled Northern Ireland: Talking Walls, Open Wounds

Twenty years after the signing of the Good Friday peace agreement, partisan murals litter the landscape of Northern Ireland reminding all of the thirty-year civil war between Catholic and Protestant neighbors.