There is a connection between addressing toilet provision as a justice issue and accepting the fact that no one can live without eliminating waste.

What the words of Lt. Calley teach us about how we see (and don’t see) our enemies.

Jeremiah dared to proclaim a covenant renewed, a world revived, a future resurrected. In the midst of a broken world, Jeremiah declared God’s endless fidelity, which brings forth life in the midst of death and despair.

Gendered public restrooms and confessionals operate by frighteningly similar schemas.

The necessary elimination of fluids from the body shouldn’t be the pretext for the unnecessary elimination of immigrants from the body politic.

“Do your business” is not just a command for Chloe to relieve; it is also an invitation to transgress boundaries and increase the flow of toilet justice.

To understand the meaning of John 3:16, we must reject the popular image of a docetic Jesus.

With the Oscars just around the corner, we convene a panel to discuss theology, morality, and politics in recent film. We begin by confronting the horrors of racism in Get Out and Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri.

Jacob Zuma is out and Cyril Ramaphosa is in as President of South Africa. Is this a new beginning for the beleaguered Rainbow Nation?

Does political theology offer strategies for resisting injustice? Or should political theology itself be resisted (because it is part of the problem)? Of course, the answer is yes.