Resisting: Political Theology

What Is Political Theology?

Does political theology offer strategies for resisting injustice? Or should political theology itself be resisted?

This symposium stems from the innaugural meeting of an ongoing program unit in politcal theology at the American Academy of Religion. Panelists were asked to speak to the theme, “Resisting: Political Theology.” We had two questions in mind: Does political theology offer strategies for resisting injustice? Or should political theology itself be resisted (because it is part of the problem)? We aimed to provoke reflection on the relevance of political theology to recent events and to raise broad questions concerning the way in which political theology is (or should be) applied in concrete contexts. In our view, these presentations demonstrate that political theology is both a persistent problem for politics and a resource for political reflection in the present moment.

Symposium Essays

Andrew Prevot

Against Cruelty

I do not know what political theology ideally ought to be. But I do know that, minimally, it should not be cruel.

William T. Cavanaugh

Re-Anarchizing Christianity

For Christians resistance must mean re-anarchizing Christianity, that is, imagining the church as a different kind of political body that transgresses national and racial and class borders in creative ways.

Communal, Contradictory, and Broken Labour

Given the magnitude of the challenges we face the task of resistance remains a communal, provisional, necessarily (ie meaningfully) contradictory, broken labour shared between sites of theory and practice.

Resist: a response

Does political theology offer strategies for resisting injustice? Or should political theology itself be resisted (because it is part of the problem)? Of course, the answer is yes.