Political Theology Welcomes New Editorial Board Members

In the Field

The journal Political Theology is very pleased to announce the addition of seven new members of its Editorial Board. These distinguished scholars further broaden the journal’s reach and scope. They include scholars of political theory, philosophy, law, anthropology, and theology, with expertise in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, based in the United States, Brazil, Israel, France, and India. They join a vibrant group of current editorial board members that includes Cornel West, Miroslav Volf, Judith Butler, and Rowan Williams. Here are the new board members:

The journal Political Theology is very pleased to announce the addition of eight new members of its Editorial Board. These distinguished scholars further broaden the journal’s reach and scope. They include scholars of political theory, philosophy, law, anthropology, and theology, with expertise in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, based in the United States, Brazil, Israel, France, and India. They join a vibrant group of current editorial board members that includes Cornel West, Miroslav Volf, Judith Butler, and Rowan Williams. Here are the new board members:

Hussein Ali Agrama is Associate Professor of Anthropology and of Social Sciences at the University of Chicago. He is the author of the acclaimed Questioning Secularism: Islam, Sovereignty, and the Rule of Law in Egypt (Chicago, 2012) as well as numerous articles about law, Islam, secularism, and sovereignty.

Abdullahi Ahmed An-Na’im is Charles Howard Candler Professor of Law at Emory Law School and a senior fellow at Emory’s Center for the Study of Law and Religion. His most recent books include What is an American Muslim? Embracing Faith and Citizenship (Oxford, 2014) and Islam and the Secular State: Negotiating the Future of Shari’a (Harvard, 2008). He previously served as Executive Director of Human Rights Watch Africa and a Scholar-in-Residence at The Ford Foundation.

Neera Chandhoke is Professor of Political Science at the University of Delhi. A leading scholar of Indian secularism and post-colonial politics, her books include Contested Secessions: Rights, Democracy, Self-Determination, and Kashmir (Oxford, 2012) and Beyond Secularism: The Rights of Religious Minorities (Oxford, 1999).

Julie Cooper is Senior Lecturer in the Political Science Department at Tel Aviv University. She is the author of Secular Powers: Humility in Modern Political Thought (Chicago, 2013) and she is currently at work on Politics Without Sovereignty? Exile, State, and Territory in Jewish Thought. Her articles have appeared in journals including Review of Politics, Political Theory, Jewish Quarterly Review.

Keri Day is Associate Professor of Theology, Social Ethics, and Black Church Studies at Brite Divinity School, and currently Visiting Associate Professor at Yale Divinity School. She is the author of Unfinished Business: Black Women, the Black Church, and the Struggle to Thrive in America (Orbis, 2012) and Religious Resistance to Neoliberalism: Womanist and Black Feminist Perspectives (Palgrave, 2015).

Jean-Claude Monod teaches philosophy at the Ecole Normale Supérieure in Paris. His books, written in French, include The Secularization Dispute: Political Theology and Philosophy of History from Hegel to Blumenberg (Vrin, 2002) and Who Leads a Democracy? The Politics of Charisma (Seuil, 2012). He has also directed and written three short films.

George Shulman is Professor at New York University’s Gallatin School of Individualized Study where is research and teaching focus on political theory and American studies. Shulman is the author of American Prophecy: Race and Redemption in American Political Culture (Minnesota, 2008), winner of the David Easton Prize in political theory.

Jung Mo Sung is Professor of Religion at Methodist University of São Paulo. A leading figure in liberation theology, Sung is the author of numerous books in Portuguese. Two of these have been translated into English: Desire, Market, and Religion (SCM Press, 2007) and The Subject, Capitalism, and Religion: Horizons of Hope in Complex Society (Palgrave, 2011).

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