Call for Papers: Intellectual Virtue, Religion, and Civil Discourse

Announcements, In the Field

Call for Papers: Political Theology has expressed interest in publishing a special issue on the theme of intellectual virtue and civil discourse (subject to editors’ and referees’ approval). Due date: June 15, 2015.

Intellectual virtues are commendable traits of thought that facilitate the acquisition of knowledge and understanding. Public discourse would be much better off when citizens exercise such virtues, it seems.

Call for Papers: Political Theology has expressed interest in publishing a special issue on the theme of intellectual virtue and civil discourse (subject to editors’ and referees’ approval). Due date: June 15, 2015.

Intellectual virtues are commendable traits of thought that facilitate the acquisition of knowledge and understanding. Public discourse would be much better off when citizens exercise such virtues, it seems. And this is especially so when public discourse concerns moral, religious, and political topics. Furthermore, analysis of intellectual virtues and vices could shed light on contemporary academic debates about topics such as tolerance and its limits; public reason; the rationality of moral, political, and religious beliefs; and the epistemological ramifications of disagreement.

We invite submissions for a special issue of Political Theology dedicated to the topic of intellectual virtue and civil discourse. In particular, we are interested in civil discourse concerning religion, morality, and politics, and preference will be given to essays that include a discussion of religion, even if that is not the main topic.

Sample topics include:

  • What are the chief intellectual virtues that promote civil discourse within societies (e.g., intellectual humility, fair-mindedness, open-mindedness, thoughtfulness), in particular, civil discourse on political, ethical, and religious matters?
  • What light do contemporary psychology, philosophy, and theology shed on the question of how intellectual virtues are acquired?
  • What are the main pedagogical methods, intentional practices, and public policy prescriptions that can aid in the acquisition of intellectual virtue?

 

Papers should not exceed 10,000 words in length and should include an abstract. Send questions and email submissions in Microsoft Word format to Stephen Bush (Brown University) at virtuediscourse@gmail.com.

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