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Category: Traditions

Religious and secular traditions are internally plural and in constant development through engagement with external others. Political theology engages these (a)religious formations and their diverse global manifestations.

Resources

Bibliography:

  1. Delores Williams, Sisters in the Wilderness: The Challenge of Womanist God-Talk (1993)
  2. Saba Mahmood, Religious Difference in a Secular Age: A Minority Report (2015)
  3. Vincent Lloyd, Black Natural Law (2016)
  4. Tisa Wenger, We Have a Religion: The 1920s Pueblo Indian Dance Controversy and American Religious Freedom (2009)
  5. Daniel Boyarin, Border Lines: The Partition of Judaeo-Christianity (2004)
  6. The Commission on Theological Concerns of the Christian Conference of Asia (ed.), Minjung Theology: People as the Subjects of History (1983)
  7. Ashon Crawley, Blackpentecostal Breath: The Aesthetics of Possibility (2016)
  8. William T. Cavanaugh, The Myth of Religious Violence: Secular Ideology and the Roots of Modern Conflict (2009)

Relevant Journal Articles:

  • Inese Radzins, “Simone Weil’s Political Theology,” Political Theology 17, no. 3 (2016): 226-242
  • Lap Yan Kung, “Parent-Child and Center-Edge Metaphors: A Theological Engagement with the Social Imaginary of ‘One Country, Two Systems,’” Political Theology 20, no. 5 (2019): 392-410
  • SherAli Tareen, “Muslim Political Theology Before and After Empire: Shāh Muḥammad Ismāʿīl’s Station of Leadership (Manṣab-i Imāmat),” Political Theology 21, no. 1-2 (2020): 105-125
  • Julie E. Cooper, “Heretic or Traitor?  Spinoza’s Excommunication and the Challenge That Judaism Poses to the Study of Religious Diversity,” Political Theology 21, no. 4 (2020): 284-302
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Our position is that recourse to armed force can only be justified as a last resort.

Too Soon for Apologies?

I suspect that, until the character of our culture has changed, individual apologies will continue to be insufficient and inadequate.