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Category: Body Politics

The representation of political subjectivity entails fundamental assumptions about who has capacity and standing to be an agent. Who counts as a political agent? What commonalities can be political mobilized? Under what significations can such identities become legible? Here we examine the complex intersections of race, class, gender, and sexuality and they are mobilized to political and theological ends.

Resources

Bibliography:

  1. Marcella Althaus-Reid, Indecent Theology: Theological Perversions in Sex, Gender, and Politics (2000)
  2. J. Kameron Carter, Race: A Theological Account (2008)
  3. Gloria Anzaldúa, Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza (1987)
  4. M. Shawn Copeland, Enfleshing Freedom (2010)
  5. Linn Tonstad, Queer Theology: Beyond Apologetics (2018)
  6. Silvia Federici, Caliban and the Witch: Women, the Body and Primitive Accumulation (2004)
  7. Sharon V. Betcher, Spirit and the Politics of Disablement (2007)
  8. Willie James Jennings, The Christian Imagination: Theology and the Origins of Race (2011)

Relevant Journal Articles:

  • Timothy McGee, “Against (White) Redemption: James Cone and the Christological Disruption of Racial Discourse and White Solidarity,” Political Theology 18, no. 7 (2017): 542-559
  • Brandy Daniels, “On Ambivalence and (Anti-)Normativity (or, Theology as a Way of Life?),” Political Theology 19, no.8 (2018): 689-697
  • Bruno M. Shah, “Enfleshing Aesthetics: Theological Anthropology in M. Shawn Copeland’s Enfleshing Freedom and Mayra Rivera’s Poetics of the Flesh,” Political Theology 20, no. 1 (2019): 48-65
Black Political Theology: Resurrection Rather Than Death

The Notre Dame Institute for Advanced Study hosted a conference at the beginning of this month on Theology and Black Politics. Opening with the question: “What is the Black Church?”, the conference addressed fundamental concerns regarding the nature of black politics and theology.