20 years, 3 Questions

History

To commemorate twenty years of the journal Political Theology, we asked a variety of scholars, including those in the Political Theology Network’s editorial collective, to reflect on where the field has been, where it is, and where it is going.

To commemorate twenty years of the journal Political Theology, we asked a variety of scholars, including those in the Political Theology Network’s editorial collective, to reflect on where the field has been, where it is, and where it is going. Specifically, we asked:

  1. Is there a conversation around political theology (as a concept, field, method, or however you understand it) from the past twenty years that continues to fascinate you?
  2. What conversations working with the concept of political theology do you find most fruitful today?
  3. Where do you hope to see discussion of political theology in 20 years?

Some of these responses were published first in the journal. Thanks is due to Bevin Blaber, Vincent Lloyd, Ari Colston, and Nathaniel Grimes who all helped to edit this symposium.

Symposium Essays

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The Bible and Politics

The narrow formulation of the concept of Political Theology as the tracing of Protestant theological categories in contemporary political thought presents some challenge for the historically oriented biblical scholar.

Gil Anidjar

Reflection on the Ongoing Catastrophe

I cannot say that I hope for more discussions of political theology in 20 years. But I do hope for the endurance of conversation, indeed, for the preservation of the art and wisdom of conversation.

Rubén Rosario Rodríguez

The “New” New: Challenging Political and Public Theology

Rather than understanding political theology as a single school of thought, I seek to define political theology as a more inclusive category by looking at the rich historical resources within each of the Abrahamic religions that help each tradition unpack the complex relationship between the political and theological spheres

M. Shawn Copeland

Wider and Deeper Analysis

While political theology must possess planetary (global) concerns, it must work locally and collaborate across locales to further understanding, decision, and action to meet those concerns.