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Tag: Resurrection

The Politics of ‘Doubting Thomas’—John 20:19-31 (Fritz Wendt)

Real faith knows and embraces doubt and questioning. Rather than locking ourselves in, as the disciples first did, we should learn from the curiosity of Thomas. The opposite of faith is not doubt but fear, and it is time to shed our fears.

The Politics of an Easter Earthquake—Matthew 28:1-10 (J. Leavitt Pearl)

The events of the first Easter invite illuminating parallels and contrasts with the shock and terror of contemporary state violence.

The Politics of Falling Back—John 21:1-19 (Robert Williamson)

The disciples’ failure to find their desired results when they returned to fishing following the resurrection of Christ resonates with the experience of many who are drawn back to old patterns of life after a personal encounter with Christ. Their struggle to recognize the risen Jesus challenges us to form communities within which Christ’s presence will be apparent to people in a similar state of uncertainty.

The Politics of Reconciliation—John 20:19-31 (Mark Davis)

That Thomas’ absence when Jesus first appeared to the Twelve after his resurrection was due to his withdrawing from the other disciples following Christ’s crucifixion is an intriguing exegetical possibility. It also frames the events that follow in a manner that may be instructive for the Church in its witness to those who are doubting and agnostic.

The Politics of Proclamation—John 20:1-18 (Jan Rippentrop)

The politics of proclamation emerge from and carry forward God’s liberative force. Mary Magdalene’s witness to the risen Christ manifests and proclaims the disruption and the liberation of God’s new reality.

The Politics of Resurrection Hermeneutics—Luke 24:36-48 (Mark Davis)

The law is a dying and rising reality, not a dead letter etched in stone. Through the hermeneutics of resurrection words once consigned to the grave of the past burst with liberating and life-giving force upon an unsuspecting world.

The Politics of Belief—John 20:19–31 (Stephen Dawson)

In John 20:31 the gospel writer speaks directly to the reader, telling her that the primary purpose of John’s Gospel is to describe the signs or miracles worked by Jesus in order that readers come to believe Jesus is indeed the Messiah. All who hold this belief will obtain eternal life.

The Politics of Resurrection and Resistance—John 20:1-18 (John Allen)

The resurrection does not erase suffering: it teaches us to live in a world torn by injustice. It gives us hope that God is present in the ugliest violence of human life, and that God engages human history to create meaning on the other side of tragedy and injustice.

“The Kingdom of Christ is Spiritual”: John Calvin and the Redemption of the Cosmos

One of the great paradoxes of John Calvin’s political theology can be captured in terms of two of the phrases the reformer used over and over throughout his writings. On the one hand, he emphasized, “the kingdom of Christ is spiritual.” On the other hand, through the kingdom of Christ God is bringing about the “restoration of the world.”

The Politics of the Empty Tomb—John 20:1-18 (Alastair Roberts)

The encounter of Mary Magdalene with the risen Christ provides us with a model for understanding political theology. The elusive presence of the resurrected one and the emptiness of his tomb forbid all our attempts to secure his presence in our praxis and open up new ways of perceiving our social task.